NSA spying, Edward Snowden, GCSB bill

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digidog
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Re: NSA spying, Edward Snowden, GCSB bill

Post by digidog » Wed May 14, 2014 11:59 pm

"Sniff it all, know it all, collect it all, process it all and exploit it all".

The latest Snowden revelations concerning our own GCSB appear to refute public denials from our PM and his old school friend Ian Fletcher concerning the true extent of our spies' activities. While everyone references the story, there seems to be a lack of investigative interest or surprise in our mainstream media. The Herald refers to a "GCSB Strategy" document from 2008 which states;
"complete mastery of the internet is a Nirvana that everyone is working towards".

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/artic ... d=11254935" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Ambitious? Not if you have the funding and a US-compliant government riding shotgun. Fairfax employ their now familiar poor grammar and disregard for sub-editing when they say;
Prime Minister John Key has earlier said he had no concerns about Snowden's revelations, and that they would not challeged (sic) the integrity of GCSB.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politic ... iff-it-all" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
The integrity of GCSB is already compromised amongst thinking people, and the rest of the herd don't seem to care.

Russell Brown provides a good analysis of the latest release and points out that last year's Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Act gives our spies enormous powers over ISPs.
Network operators must notify GCSB when changes to their networks are proposed and GCSB may need to be involved ahead of any network infrastructure purchases.

http://publicaddress.net/hardnews/snowd ... w-zealand/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Backdoors anyone? "Sniff it all, know it all, collect it all, process it all and exploit it all." How very third world dictatorish.

PDF of the 108 page slideshow (12.9Mb)

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Re: NSA spying, Edward Snowden, GCSB bill

Post by digidog » Thu May 15, 2014 4:41 am

Internet NZ has called for John key to come clean about the GCSB's real activities.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/artic ... d=11255485" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: NSA spying, Edward Snowden, GCSB bill

Post by digidog » Thu May 15, 2014 6:19 am

BoingBoing has added its weight to Juha Saarinen's latest post on NZ's Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Act and points out that
"When the rest of the world decides to scrutinise and dial down mass surveillance of Internet users, New Zealand does the opposite."
Surprisingly, the GCSB gets to decide who can and cannot work for our Telcos.
Providers will also be required to have their staff vetted for security clearance. However, the GCSB will not run the security clearance process itself, and warns that this "may take a significant length of time."
Juha provides a handy flowchart for ISPs to follow.
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I certainly didn't vote for NZ to become a banana republic. Hands up if you know anyone who did.

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Re: NSA spying, Edward Snowden, GCSB bill

Post by digidog » Mon May 19, 2014 7:54 pm

In some misguided attempt to try and reclaim an imagined moral high ground they lost comprehensively following the Snowden revelations, the US government has accused "state-sponsored individuals in China" of hacking into systems belonging to US companies. Yep... brought to you by the country which controls the largest and most intrusive hacking network the world has ever seen.
The US Justice Department indicted five Chinese military officers with stealing data from six US companies and unions on Monday, inaugurating a major escalation of tensions with China over economic spycraft.

Attorney general Eric Holder announced that the US for the first time would seek to bring officials of a foreign government to the US to face charges of infiltrating American computer networks to steal data beneficial to US trade competitors. The Justice Department even went as far as printing “wanted” posters.

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2 ... -espionage" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Because there is no extradition treaty between the US and China, the US has no way to enforce this indictment. However they have printed "wanted" posters for the culprits.
Image

Thank God we have America to protect us all from the evil of online spying and monitoring!

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Bahamas Brouhaha

Post by Foggyone » Tue May 20, 2014 6:39 pm

This trainwreck continues.

Latest Snowden leak claims NSA bugged ALL mobile calls in the Bahamas.
A fresh dossier of documents apparently from NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden claims that the NSA is running a telephone-tapping system that records the metadata and content of all mobile phone calls of two countries, including the island paradise of the Bahamas.
I can quite understand how the Yanks would feel threatened by the Bahamas. After all, it's 400,000 people must pose a HUGE security risk, and being a member of the Commonwealth would automatically make them "the enemy". And their per head income, being higher than the USA, would attract on the grounds of envy. Yes, I can quite see the legitimacy of this spying.
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Re: NSA spying, Edward Snowden, GCSB bill

Post by Foggyone » Tue May 20, 2014 7:52 pm

Further to the story above about the FBI charging some Chinese with spying (pot and kettle territory), the Chinese have replied.

We're the real hacking victims, says China

I suspect the truth lies somewhere in the middle.

In another story on the wires today which may be related, The Chinese government has banned Windows 8 from a sizeable chunk of public-sector PCs – capping off a long-running dispute with Microsoft over the company's decision to cut support for XP. It's NOT about Windows XP.

It's all part of the NSA price being paid by US corporations.
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Microsoft: US government an 'advanced persistent threat'

Post by digidog » Wed May 21, 2014 11:45 pm

Microsoft has officially stated that the US government is an 'advanced persistent threat' - a term normally reserved to describe an organized group of malicious attackers. The MS post states, "Many of our customers have serious concerns about government surveillance of the Internet." ZDNet doesn't mess with words.
To see one of America's biggest companies say it must protect itself from its own government as it would from a group of malfeasant Chinese cyber-spies is a moment for the history books

http://www.zdnet.com/microsoft-us-gover ... 000024019/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Here's the MS post from Brad Smith, General Counsel & Executive Vice President, Legal & Corporate Affairs, Microsoft.

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Re: NSA spying, Edward Snowden, GCSB bill

Post by digidog » Sat May 24, 2014 10:59 pm

Further to Foggyone's post (above) regarding the NSA recording all calls in the Bahamas and another, unnamed country... Wikileaks reveals that the country in question is Afghanistan.

http://wikileaks.org/WikiLeaks-statemen ... -mass.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Spying In NZ

Post by Foggyone » Sat Jun 07, 2014 2:04 am

Vodafone has published a comprehensive report listing how Governments around the world interface with Vodafone to spy on citizens. This information is in a n 88 page report obtainable from here. http://www.vodafone.com/content/dam/sus ... report.pdf" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

There is a section on New Zealand (pages 62 to 66)

There are sections on other countries where Vodafone does business.

The story may be read here.

Kudos to Vodafone for publishing this information.
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Re: NSA spying, Edward Snowden, GCSB bill

Post by Foggyone » Thu Jun 19, 2014 7:52 pm

I noted early on, when the revelations started, that this could adversly affect US tech firms.

Microsoft: NSA security fallout 'getting worse,' 'not blowing over'

While this brouhaha may be slipping from the minds of the hoi polloi the decision makers won't forget. We already have the situation where China has put a blanket ban on Windows 8 in their Government operations, this is just the tip of the iceberg. This type of decision will likely be being made right around the world in all sorts of tech situations. The ultimate cost will be very high
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Americans Slowly Awaking

Post by Foggyone » Mon Jun 30, 2014 6:53 pm

Americans as 'vulnerable' to NSA surveillance as foreigners, despite Fourth Amendment
"The loopholes in current surveillance laws and today's Internet technology may leave American communications as vulnerable to surveillance, and as unprotected as the internet traffic of foreigners," Arnbak said.

Although Americans are afforded constitutional protections against the US government from unwarranted searches of their emails, documents, social networking data, and other cloud-stored data while it's stored or in-transit on US soil, the researchers suggest these protections do not exist when American data leaves the country.

By manipulating Internet traffic to push American data outside of the country, the NSA can vacuum up vast amounts of US citizen data for intelligence purposes, thus "circumventing constitutional and statutory safeguards seeking to protect the privacy of Americans," they warned.
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Re: NSA spying, Edward Snowden, GCSB bill

Post by digidog » Tue Jul 01, 2014 2:45 am

And you'd have to expect that the Waihope spy base is being used to process a lot of US data.

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Swiss Company In Trouble With Uncle Sam

Post by Foggyone » Thu Jul 03, 2014 6:25 pm

ProtonMail and Paypal: Do we need government approval to encrypt email?

This story has the potential to really lift the scab on this festering sore of a story, and give the whole subject legs again.
So how does a service like that get a Swiss company into trouble with Paypal?

Well, ProtonMail is running a crowdfunding campaign via indiegogo, and Paypal just happens to be one avenue of contributing to the campaign. The opening paragraph of a blog post on the company’s official blog gives you an idea of what happened:

This morning, we received an email and telephone call from PayPal notifying us that our account has been restricted pending further review. At this time, it is not possible for ProtonMail to receive or send funds through PayPal. No attempt was made by PayPal to contact us before freezing our account, and no notice was given.

Does that smell like what happened to WikiLeaks? Yes, it does. But why? ProtonMail has not leaked any US government secrets. Or is it because ProtonMail’s service is too secure for Big Brother? This next quote, from the same source as the first one, sheds some light on why Paypal has blocked the company’s access to funds via Paypal’s services.

When we pressed the PayPal representative on the phone for further details, he questioned whether ProtonMail is legal and if we have government approval to encrypt emails. We are not sure which government PayPal is referring to, but even the 4th Amendment of the US constitution guarantees …

Wow! Government approval to encrypt emails? Is that how far down we’ve gone, or is that just a preview of how it’s going to be down the road?
Do we need NZ Government approval to encrypt emails??????????

Here's a tutorial on using encryption with Thunderbird.
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Re: NSA spying, Edward Snowden, GCSB bill

Post by digidog » Fri Jul 04, 2014 5:26 am

New documents (leaked by someone other than Mr E. Snowden) reveal that the NSA's XKeyscore spy software targets Tor users and "Linux Journal" readers. Yep.. anyone interested in online security appears to be a target. I guess it's easier than trying to catch real terrorists.
If you take even the slightest interest in online privacy or have Googled a Linux Journal article about a broken package, you are in an NSA surveillance database, according to these latest leaks.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/07/03 ... i_scandal/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: NSA spying, Edward Snowden, GCSB bill

Post by digidog » Sat Jul 05, 2014 12:27 am

Following up yesterday's story BoingBoing discusses the rules used by the NSA to decide who is a "target" for surveillance. To be clear, we're not talking metadata here.
Targets of NSA surveillance don't have their data flushed from the NSA's databases on a rolling 48-hour or 30-day basis, but are instead retained indefinitely.
More importantly, this shows that the NSA uses "targeted surveillance" in a way that beggars common sense. It's a dead certainty that people who heard the NSA's reassurances about "targeting" its surveillance on people who were doing something suspicious didn't understand that the NSA meant people who'd looked up technical details about systems that are routinely discussed on the front page of every newspaper in the world.
This means that anyone who shows an interest in online privacy is seen as a valid NSA target. (Hi NSA guys!)
One expert suggested that the NSA's intention here was to separate the sheep from the goats -- to split the entire population of the Internet into "people who have the technical know-how to be private" and "people who don't" and then capture all the communications from the first group.

http://boingboing.net/2014/07/03/if-you ... the-n.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Hey Foggyone... you're a Linux guy. If you've ever looked at the "Linux Journal" you're probably a person of interest. Have you noticed any odd clicks on your phone lately? ;-)

http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/nsa ... rveillance" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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